HHS Weekly Stakeholder Bulletin – January 7-11, 2019

Weekly Stakeholder Bulletin
Week of January 7-11, 2019

 

HHS TOP NEWS

On Wednesday, Secretary Azar participated in an interview with Fox Business Network’s Varney and Co. He delivered a clear message from the President and administration to drug companies and pharmacy benefit managers, that list prices must come down.

“The President and I were meeting about our plans to bring down drug prices and I want to be really clear to PhRMA companies out there and to the pharmacy benefit managers, the President and I will not stop until list prices of drugs come down; this behavior has to stop. Drug prices must come down and we will roll out more regulatory and legislative proposals and we will work with Democrats and Republicans to get drug prices down.”

Secretary Azar: “[E]very minute the next six years, the President and I are going to work to drive regulatory and legislative change to bring those prices down for the benefit of the American patient. We’re going to work with anyone; all options are on the table if they deliver solutions that keep the patient at the center and keep America’s patients safe.”

Stuart Varney: “Those are fighting words, Mr. Secretary.”

Secretary Azar: “They are indeed.”

Click here to watch Secretary Azar’s Interview: Fox Business Network’s Varney and Co 

 

HHS Digital/Social Media Content

National Birth Defects Month, Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, and Evergreen Tobacco-Related Content  
The Center for Tobacco Products has created social media content for January Health Observances. The content below can be used on your social media channels to share tobacco-related public health messages around these health observances. Note: Emojis in this document may appear different (potentially as a question mark or square box) than when posted on social media. These will convert to intended emojis when pasted into social media channels.

Twitter

  • January is National Birth Defects Month. Help prevent birth defects by staying smoke-free. If you are pregnant  and need quit resources and tips, visit https://women.smokefree.gov/ #Best4YouBest4Baby via @FDATobacco
  • #DYK Infants born to mothers who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy are at a higher risk of low birth weight and lungs that don’t develop in a normal way.  Protect your infant by staying smoke-free. Visit https://go.usa.gov/xUsyF to find out more information. #Best4YouBest4Baby
  • Smoking during pregnancy may be linked to congenital heart defects (CHDs) in babies, which can affect blood flow through the heart.  Learn more about how to have a safe, smoke-free pregnancy by visiting: https://go.usa.gov/xUsyF #Best4YouBest4Baby via @FDATobacco
  • Babies whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are more likely to be born with birth defects. Protect your baby by being smoke-free. Find out how to remain smoke-free during pregnancy at https://women.smokefree.gov/ #Best4YouBest4Baby via @FDATobacco

Facebook

  • January is National Birth Defects Month. Help prevent birth defects by staying smoke-free. If you are pregnant  and need quit resources and tips, visit https://women.smokefree.gov/ via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • Infants born to mothers who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy are at a higher risk of low birth weight and lungs that don’t develop in a normal way.  Protect your infant by staying smoke-free. Visit  https://go.usa.gov/xUsye to find out more information via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • Smoking during pregnancy may be linked to congenital heart defects (CHDs) in babies, which can affect blood flow through the heart.  Learn more about how to have a safe, smoke-free pregnancy by visiting: https://go.usa.gov/xUsye via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • Babies whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are more likely to be born with birth defects. Protect your baby by being smoke-free. Find out how to remain smoke-free during pregnancy at https://women.smokefree.gov/ via FDA Center for Tobacco Products

Twitter

  • January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, a chance to raise awareness about how women can protect themselves from cervical cancer.  Smoking can cause cervical cancer. Find more information and resources https://women.smokefree.gov/ #CervicalHealthMonth via @FDATobacco
  • True or False? Smoking just affects the lungs and heart.  False Smoking can cause cervical cancer. Learn more facts about cervical cancer and smoking at https://women.smokefree.gov/  #CervicalHealthMonth via @FDATobacco
  • Smoking can cause cervical cancer. #CervicalHealthMonth Becoming smoke-free is important for protecting your health. Learn about different tools to help you become smoke-free and how to use them at https://women.smokefree.gov/ via @FDATobacco
  • Do you know how smoking affects women’s health? Learn more about women and smoking and how you can take steps to protect your health. #CervicalHealthMonth https://go.usa.gov/xUsyF via @FDATobacco
  • Smoking can cause cervical cancer. This #CervicalHealthMonth start your journey to becoming smoke-free. Resources to help you become and stay smoke-free are available at: https://women.smokefree.gov/ via @FDATobacco
  • Do you know some ways you can protect yourself from cervical cancer?  Get screened  Talk to your doctor  Stay smoke-free Learn more information about women’s health and smoking at https://go.usa.gov/xUsyF #CervicalHealthMonth via @FDATobacco

Facebook

  • January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, a chance to raise awareness about how women can protect themselves from cervical cancer.  Smoking can cause cervical cancer. Find more information and resources https://women.smokefree.gov/ via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • Do you know how smoking affects women’s health? This Cervical Health Month learn more about women and smoking and how you can take steps to protect your health. https://go.usa.gov/xUsye via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • Smoking can cause cervical cancer. This Cervical Health Month start your journey to becoming smoke-free. Resources to help you become and stay smoke-free are available at: https://women.smokefree.gov/ via FDA Center for Tobacco Products

Twitter

  • Nearly 1 person dies every minute in the U.S. from smoking and secondhand smoke. Find out more about secondhand smoke at: https://go.usa.gov/xPSzt via @FDATobacco
  • If nobody ever smoked, we could prevent 480,000 deaths in the U.S. per year. Find support, tips, tools, and advice for becoming smoke-free at https://smokefree.gov/ via @FDATobacco
  • Smoking can cause dangerous buildup of a substance called plaque inside your arteries, which can lead to heart attack and sudden death. Protect your heart and stay smoke-free via @FDATobacco https://go.usa.gov/xPhKr
  • When it comes to tobacco, “all-natural” doesn’t mean “safe.” Some of the toxic chemicals in cigarettes are present in the tobacco plant itself. Learn more about the chemicals in cigarettes from plant, to product, to puff via @FDATobacco https://go.usa.gov/xPSuP
  • Smoking can block blood flow to the brain and lead to stroke, which can cause brain damage and death. Visit https://smokefree.gov to receive free tips and advice for staying smoke-free via @FDATobacco

Facebook

  • Nearly 1 person dies every minute in the U.S. from smoking and secondhand smoke. Find out more about secondhand smoke at: https://go.usa.gov/xPSzu via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • If nobody ever smoked, we could prevent 480,000 deaths in the U.S. per year. Find support, tips, tools, and advice for becoming smoke-free at https://smokefree.gov/ via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • Smoking can cause dangerous buildup of a substance called plaque inside your arteries, which can lead to heart attack and sudden death. Protect your heart and stay smoke-free. https://go.usa.gov/xUsVC via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • When it comes to tobacco, “all-natural” doesn’t mean “safe.” Some of the toxic chemicals in cigarettes are present in the tobacco plant itself. Learn more about the chemicals in cigarettes from plant, to product, to puff. https://go.usa.gov/xPSuE via FDA Center for Tobacco Products
  • Smoking can block blood flow to the brain and lead to stroke, which can cause brain damage and death. Visit https://smokefree.gov to receive free tips and advice for staying smoke-free via FDA Center for Tobacco Products

 

HHS Digital/Social Media Content

On-the-Spot – ASAM Integration and Application – Am I doing this right?

On-the-Spot (OtS) is an online opportunity for Mental Health, Substance Use Disorders, and Recovery Support Services providers to obtain real time input on a variety of behavioral health topics delivered by consultants. OtS is an open, one-hour forum guided by participants’ questions with responses provided by consultants/faculty of the Mountain Plains ATTC. The goal of OtS is to serve as another tool to increase knowledge, build skills, and change practice through the adoption of evidence-based practices and promising practices. Finally, we welcome all feedback, discussion, and questions during the OtS session and consider it a privilege to learn from all.
On-the-Spot

ASAM Integration and Application – Am I doing this right?
3rd Friday of every month

Next session: January 18, 2019

9:00 am Mountain Time / 10:00 am Mountain Time

Having difficulty applying and/or integrating the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Criteria? Join On-the-Spot this month for a one-hour session with a knowledgeable ASAM professional who will answer and discuss questions related to:

  • program development;
  • 6-dimensional assessment and treatment planning; and
  • continued service, transfer and discharge management.

Participants will have the opportunity to share case studies and receive guidance on how to use ASAM to make informed decisions with the client across the continuum of care. OtS is an open forum guided by the participants at each session. No registration required.

We look forward to meeting you and providing guidance on using ASAM.

Join ASAM Integration and Application OtS using the Zoom login below:
Step 1: Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/280136361
Step 2:  Join by Telephone (ONLY if device does not have a microphone built in)
Phone: +1 669 900 6833 (US Toll) or +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll)
Meeting ID: 280 136 361

 

HHS Digital/Social Media Content
HHS Community Health News

New Infographic 2018 Monitoring the Future Survey
This infographic of the NIH’s 2018 Monitoring the Future survey highlights drug use trends among the Nation’s youth for vaping, marijuana, alcohol, cigarettes, and prescription/OTC drugs. The survey has measured how teens report their drug and alcohol use and related attitudes since 1975.

“Talk. They Hear You.” App!
Share this app with parents in your community so that they can prepare for one of the most important conversations they may ever have with their kids about underage drinking.  Watch this quick video to see how SAMHSA’s Talk “They Hear You” works!

Public Comments Requested

Draft Report on Pain Management Best Practices: Updates, Gaps, Inconsistencies, and Recommendations
The HHS Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force, charged with providing advice and recommendations to relevant federal agencies and the general public for the development and dissemination of best practices for managing chronic and acute pain, published a draft report in the Federal Register on Dec. 31, 2018. The public has until April 1, 2019 to submit comments.

Changing Privacy Regulations in HIPAA
The HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) seeks public comment on certain aspects of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).  In this request, the OCR seeks to remove regulatory obstacles and decrease regulatory burdens in order to facilitate efficient care coordination while preserving the privacy and security of “protected health information” or PHI.  The public has until Feb. 12, 2019 to submit comments.

GRANTS
End-of-Life and Palliative Needs of Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with Serious Illnesses (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)
The purpose of this National Institutes of Health’s funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to foster research on the unique perspectives, needs, wishes, and decision-making processes of adolescents and young adults with serious, advanced illnesses; and research focused on specific end-of-life/palliative care (EOLPC) models that support the physical, psychological, spiritual, and social needs of AYA with serious illness, their families and caregivers. Additional information here.

 

 

HHS Digital/Social Media Content
WEBCAST

“From Africa to the United States: Addressing access to early detection and treatment of cervical and breast cancers.”

Date: January 14, 2019
Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm Eastern Time

Groesbeck Parham, M.D., professor at UNC-Chapel Hill, Division of Global Women’s Health

Renowned gynecologic oncologist Dr. Groesbeck Parham will be visiting HRSA to present a seminar on strategies for improving access to care for cervical and breast cancer early detection and treatment. He will discuss how these strategies, with the use of technology and task-shifting, may be applied to gynecological practices in the U.S.

To view the webcast follow: https://services.choruscall.com/links/hrsa190114.html.

Dr. Parham’s expertise is concentrated on the link between HIV/AIDS and cervical cancer in Zambia, Africa and his work on scaling up public sector cervical and breast cancer services in resource-poor global environments has been sought by the World Health Organization and United Nations Population Fund.

 

HHS Digital/Social Media Content
WEBINAR

Webinar: It Takes A Village

 

How data, community, and culture combine to address birth outcomes disparities
When: Thursday, January 31, 2019
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MST

 

Register Here